CARE FOR CUT FLOWERS & GLOSSARY

GENERAL NOTE
To avoid disturbing the stem placements in a vase arrangement, tie the stems with twine just above the vase’s edge before taking them out of their vase. Hold the tied arrangement at the twine-bound point to re-cut the stems. Then place them back into the clean vase with the fresh water and a flower food.

HOME MADE SOLUTION FOR CUT FLOWERS

1 qt. of lukewarm water, 1 tsp. sugar, 1 tsp. bleach and 2 tsp. of lime or lemon juice. Mix it thoroughly and use this to water your cut flowers

ALSTROEMERIA

The buds of your Alstroemeria may appear, when new, to be very tight; with proper nutrition from flower food they should open to full bloom and maximum enjoyment. Alstroemeria are particularly thirsty flowers, so check the vase often to ensure it is full (or the foam material is saturated) and add floral food with each water change.
AMARYLLIS

AMARYLLIS Amaryllis may arrive with some of their blooms closed, but with proper care, they will open into large flowers. Their stems need to stay filled with water at all times, so when you refresh the water and re-cut the stems, turn them upside down and fill them with water, plugging the bottom of each stem with a cotton ball or your finger until it is back in the vase. Their stems can be brittle and may bend or break when you refresh them. Keeping them trimmed daily and even wrapping the stem ends in clear tape will help prevent this. As new blooms open, carefully pinch off older, wilting blooms.
BELLS OF IRELAND

These tiny, fragrant, green bells are arranged in rings forming a vertical column. Each bell has a tiny white blossom in the center. Follow the care guidelines listed above for amaryllis, and your bells of Ireland should last 7-10 days.
BIRDS OF PARADISE

Each stem of a bird of paradise usually contains about 4 to 5 flowers (called inflorescence) sometimes only one flower is visible, where others are hidden in another part of the flower. When one exposed flower withers it should be removed and another one can be pulled out of the flower’s boat shaped bract. If a flower doesn’t emerge, gently ease it out by hand. These exotic blooms are sensitive to temperatures below 50 degrees F, so display them in a warm spot.
CALLAS (both full size and miniature varieties)

The same general care guidelines described on page 1 apply to callas but because their spathe (the colored part of the flower) can bruise easily, it’s important to be particularly gentle when handling them. Callas have thick fleshy stems that tend to curl at the bottom as they age. They should be recut every 2 days for maximum vase life. They tend to be thirsty flowers, so check the water level of your vase.
CARNATIONS

The same general care guidelines described above apply to carnations, including their sensitivity to ethylene, a harmless (note: it does not harm humans or animals), naturally produced gas, which can be released by fruits, vegetables, and decaying floral materials. Keep arranged carnations free of ethylene producing materials for best results. When you re-cut the stems, cut them just above one of the nodes that run up the flower’s stalk. This will allow the stem to more easily draw the water it needs. When properly cared for carnations can last 7-14 days, depending on variety often.
CHRYSANTHEMUMS

Chrysanthemums come in a wide variety of colors, shapes and petal formations. Some even look like the most exotic blossoms you’ve ever seen – in unusual colors with single or multiple blossoms per stem. It’s important to remove the foliage of chrysanthemums if it begins to droop or yellow. The foliage often deteriorates more quickly than the flowers themselves. Recutting the stems often will also increase the uptake of water and increase vase life. Most chrysanthemums will last 7 to 12 days on average.
CRASPEDIA

Craspedia globosa remain attractive in a vase for about five to eight days. Flowers do well with floral preservative added to the water. Besides incorporating this flower in a floral arrangement, it also makes a nice dried flower.
DENDROBIUM ORCHIDS

The same general care guidelines described above apply to dendrobium orchids, including their sensitivity to ethylene gas, which can be released by fruits, vegetables, and decaying floral materials.
EREMURUS

Remove flowers from the stalk as they die. Normally, you will remove the lower flowers first. Doing this will help to keep your eremurus looking good for a longer time. Watch the flowers in your bouquet. If your eremurus flowers go limp, re-cut the bottom of the stem; it is most likely not absorbing enough water. Remove dead stalks right away, which will help those remaining to last longer.
GODETIA

Godetia, also known as satin flower, last five to seven days as cut flowers when displayed in a cool, shaded area. To care for the cut flowers, replace the water in the vase every three days and re-cut ½ inch from each stem base under water.
HYACINTH

The same general care guidelines described above apply to hyacinths, but keep in mind that when their stems are cut, they release sap that can shorten the life of other flowers. To prevent this, after cutting their stems, place them in a bucket of water for at least 12 hours on their own before mixing them with other flowers. In modern designs, hyacinths are arranged with the bulbs and roots in tact, as part of the composition. The soil is washed from the roots to prevent the water from becoming dirty.
HYDRANGEA

Hydrangeas have woody stems that need to draw water for maximum vase life (10 days). If a blossom wilts prematurely, remove it from the design, recut the stem at a sharp angle and place in warm water for at least one hour. The flower should be revived and ready to take its place in the design. For best results keep the water level in their vase full. Hydrangeas can also be dried, by hanging them upside down in a warm spot. Although the color will fade slightly – the dried flowers can last between 9 months to a year.
IRIS

Iris may arrive in your vase arrangement as tight buds. But they will open quickly and mature to open form usually within one or two days. Their beautiful blue blossom look good with other spring flowers like tulips and lilies. Their vase life is 3-5 days. Keep water levels in the vase full and bacteria free for best results.
KANGAROO PAW

Keep the water in the vase of your Kangaroo Paw fresh. Replace the water every 3rd day with cold water keeping the water level near the top of the vase. Re-cut 1/2" from the base of each Kangaroo Paw stem under water using a sharp knife with each water change. Expected vase life is 10-14 days an it is available year round.
LILAC

Cut the stems. Using a sharp knife or pruning shears, cut each lilac stem approximately 1 inch from the bottom of the main stem at a 45-degree angle. Cutting at an angle will help the stems stand in the vase and ensure a larger area is exposed to water for maximum water uptake. Remove any leaves, and immediately place the lilac stems into a plastic bucket of warm water with floral preservative. Cut flowers that are not provided water quickly will seal up, and the flowers will not last as long. Prepare the stems. The key to long-lasting lilac arrangements is to move water and nutrients through the stems as soon as possible. The stems of lilacs do not take up water easily. To increase surface area for maximum water absorption, use a sharp knife or shears to split the end of each stem upward approximately 1 inch. Do not smash the stems with a hammer or you'll damage the vascular tissue. Be sure to pick the correct vase size. According to flower expert Rose Edinger, the height of the lilacs should not be more than 1 1/2 times the height of the vase. Keep the vase out of the direct sunlight.
LISIANTHUS

Lisianthus have rose-like showy blossoms in grand colors, and with proper care they can last 7-10 days. Many of the unopened buds which show color may open fully. Smaller buds may not open but simply support the larger blossoms and accent the foliage.
MOLECCULA/BELLS OF IRELAND

Keep the water in the vase of your Bells of Ireland fresh. It is important to replace the water every 3 days with cold water keeping the water level near the top of the vase. Re-cut 1/2" from the base of each Bells of Ireland stem under water using a sharp knife with each water change. Remove any of the "Bells" that may become submerged after re-cutting to avoid bacterial growth.
PEONIES

Follow the general care guidelines described above, placing your peonies in a cool place out of direct sunlight. Peonies often arrive in bud stage and open fully while in the design. The open blossoms can be fragile and shatter if mishandled so give them space and move them only as necessary. With proper care they should last about 7 days.
PHALENOPSIS ORCHID

Most cut orchids and Anthurium—araceous plants, which include calla lilies— will last longer as stems than as single blooms; a cut orchid arrangement will last longer than a boutonniere. Flowers should be as fresh as possible. If they appear a little wilted, they can be submerged in warm water for a few minutes. After stems are purchased and brought home, 1/2 inch (approximately 2 cm) should be cut from the base of the stem with a sharp knife—if possible while the stem is submerged in water—then place the stems in a vase of WARM but not hot water. Blooms should be kept away from direct sunlight and heat sources. They will last longer at cooler room temperatures, but will suffer from cool drafts. A cool draft is moving air that is cooler than the ambient temperature, such as air from an open window on a cool day.
SNAPDRAGON

Used as a line flower mixed with other flowers. Lasts 10 - 15 days depending on bud stage. Does not dry well. Keep the water in the vase of your Snapdragons fresh. Replace the water every 3 days with cold water keeping the water level near the top of the vase. Re-cut 1/2" from the base of each Snapdragon stem under water using a sharp knife with each water change. Remove any foliage that may become submerged after re-cutting.
Variety note : In the trade they call Snapdragons... Snaps. This versatile flower is available year round in shades of lavender, pink, orange, red, white, burgundy, yellow, and bi-colors. Stem lengths vary between 30" to 48" depending on variety and grower. Snapdragons are sensitive to ethylene gas (generally not a problem in the home). Their strong stems are easy to arrange in a vase or in Oasis foam. Snapdragons are sold in 10 stem bunches. The "Snapdragons" Latin name is derived from the Greek words anti meaning "like" and rhin meaning "a nose"... referring to its nose shaped flowers.
TRACHELLIUM

Coming soon..........
VERONICA

Longevity : 5 - 7 days depending on bud stage. Does not dry well Keep the water in the vase of your Veronica fresh. Replace the water every 3 days with cold water keeping the water level near the top of the vase. Re-cut 1/2" from the base of each Veronica stem under water using a sharp knife with each water change. Remove any foliage that may become submerged after re-cutting. Variety note: Veronica is available in two colors, blue (pictured) and pink. Veronica is often times confused with Lysmachia which looks very similar except it has white flowers. Veronica is available nearly year round and sold in 10 stem bunches. When using Veronica in vase arrangements be sure to remove any foliage that may be below the water line to prevent bacteria formation in the water.
WAX FLOWER

A small filler flower will last 7 - 10 days Display in a cool, shaded area. Does not dry well.General Filler Flower Care: Keep the water in the vase of your Waxflower fresh. Replace the water every 3 days with cold water keeping the water level near the top of the vase. Re-cut 1/2" from the base of each Wax Flower stem under water using a sharp knife with each water change. Remove any foliage that may become submerged after re-cutting.
Variety note : Waxflower is a small family of plants containing 21 varieties of evergreen shrubs found natively only in Australia. Waxflower is a great filler alternative to Baby's Breath. Wax flower is available in several natural colors as well as many tinted shades. When freshly cut Waxflower stems have a citrus like aroma. Waxflower bunches usually measure 12" to 18" in length. Waxflower is sold in a 10 or more stem bunch. Wax flower is ethylene sensitive.
ROSES

Follow the general care guidelines described above for your roses, being sure to remove any discolored petals on the flower’s outer edge (called guard petals) and foliage that fall below the waterline when refreshing your arrangement. Recutting the stems often will give your roses the longest vase life. If your roses begin to wilt, you may be able to revive them. Trim off about an inch from the bottom of its stem and then submerge the entire rose under water in a sink or bathtub. Allow the stem to absorb water for about 20-60 minutes before returning them to their vase. Roses last longer in a cool area, but if you want their blooms to open quickly, temporarily place them in a warmer spot (Note: not hotter than 80 degrees Fahrenheit)
TULIPS

Remove Foliage from the part of the stems that will be under water in your vase. Cut off any white portion of the stem to allow better fluid intake. To prevent the intake of air into the stems, give them a fresh cut under water. Place immediately in a vase filled with water and fresh flower nutrients (preservative).Recut 1 inch from the flower stems every 4-5 days to maintain water uptake. Do not place in the same container as daffodils that have been recut. The sap from the daffodils can kill the tulips. Check the water in the vase frequently.
Special Note : To straighten bent tulips, wrap the stems tightly in damp newspaper, secure with an elastic band, and stand in deep, lukewarm water with light directly above them. Leave for a couple of hours.
More About Tulips : Tulips don't know when to stop! Tulips keep growing in the vase gaining an inch in height or more. And they bend toward sources of light.Tulips combine well with other flowers, they are particularly suited to pairings with the early spring "branches" such as forsythia, pussy willows, and corkscrew willow, that are found in the flower market in late winter and spring.